The OHS Pipe Organ Database

BuilderID 907

Builder Identification

Toronto, Ontario, Canada, c. 1980s.

Additional Notes

  • Note from the OHS PC Database, derived from A Guide to North American Organbuilders, by David H. Fox (Richmond, Va.: Organ Historical Society, 1991). —

    In Toronto, Canada; purchased organ supplies, c. 1980s.

    Source:

    • A mailing list of purchasers of organ supplies compiled by several prominent firms. The entries that appear in this list are of undetermined date and may not necessarily represent organbuilders.
    •  

  • Note from Organ Database Builders editor Stephen Hall, November 19, 2017. —

    Giles (Bradley) Bryant. British/Canadian Organist-choirmaster, tenor, editor, born in Weybridge, Surrey, England, June 20, 1934; BA (University College, London) 1957, ARCO 1978, honorary D LITT S (Wycliffe, Toronto) 1988.

    Giles Bryant was a boy chorister, and later assistant organist at St George's College in Weybridge. He emigrated to Canada in 1959, settling in Toronto where he became assistant organist at Grace Church on-the-Hill and was a member of the Festival Singers, Canada's first professional chorus. He served as organist-choirmaster at St Mary the Virgin Anglican Church, later at St Andrew's Presbyterian Church, and in 1968 succeeded Healey Willan at St Mary Magdalene Anglican Church. In 1968 he formed a male-voice ensemble, the Clerkes, who performed under his regular direction until 1975. He was organist 1965-1975 at Massey College, and organist-choirmaster 1973-1975 at Trinity College, both University of Toronto. He taught 1971–1972 at York University and was music director 1972–1975 at Upper Canada College. He returned to England in 1975, and was director of music 1975–1978 at Cranborne Chase school, near Salisbury. During the period, he was also a free-lance lecturer and broadcaster for the BBC.

    He returned to Canada in 1978 where he replaced Elmer Iseler as music director of the Festival Singers, (part of a larger reorganization of the chorus), and led them until they ceased operations in 1979. That year he assumed duties as organist-choirmaster at St James Cathedral, Toronto, and founder-conductor of the Sine Nomine Singers. He joined the staff of Royal St George's College, Toronto in 1981. At the Royal Conservatory of Music, Toronto, he directed the Repertory Chorus and the Conservatory Singers 1986–1989, and beginning in 1990 he taught choral music at the RCMT Summer School. In 1987 he became executive director of the Kiwanis Music Festival of Greater Toronto. He was national president of the RCCO 1990–1992.

    Sources:

    • Margaret Drynan, "Giles Bryant" The Canadian Encyclopedia, this article published May 10, 2007, last edited December 15, 2013, accessed November 19, 2017, http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/giles-bryant-emc/.
    • Isabelle Margaret Mills, "Festival Singers of Canada" The Canadian Encyclopedia, this article published February 7, 2006, last edited May 25, 2015, accessed November 19, 2017, http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/festival-singers-of-canada/.
    • RCCO website, "List of Past Presidents", accessed November 19, 2017, https://www.rcco.ca/uploads/File/Governance/presidents.pdf
    •  

Database Entries

There are no entries in the database that describe organs by Giles Bryant.


We are always interested in adding to our information about builders and correcting any errors that our Database may contain. If you can provide us with corrections or additions to the information presented here, please click the Update button and use the online form to send us details.

Your cooperation and support are greatly appreciated.


 

OHS Logo

This page was opened in a secondary window or tab. To return to the list of builders, simply close this tab.

Some of our entries are names that might never appear on a nameplate or nameboard.
On the other hand, there are both individuals and firms who are responsible for conserving historic organs through location, or preserving the usefulness of pipe organs through rebuilding or making modifications to existing instruments. In these cases, we are proud to acknowledge their contributions to the ongoing artistic tradition of the pipe organ in America through individual entries in our online database.