Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

E. & G. G. Hook View Extant Instruments View Instruments

Distinction:

Boston, Massachusetts 1827-1872; succeeded by E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings.
Classification: Builder

Update This Entry
May 07, 2018:

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/ / / / Archived Note / / / /

The following note is from a previous version of this entry; it has been superseded by the note above, which contains additional information.

Begin original note:

Note from the OHS PC Database, derived from A Guide to North American Organbuilders, by David H. Fox (Richmond, Va., Organ Historical Society, 1991; rev. ed., 1997, with updated information). Edited for the revised OHS Online Database website, 2017. -

Established by Elias and George G. Hook in Salem, Massachusetts, 1827; relocated to Boston, Massachusetts, 1831; succeeded by E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings, 1872.

Staff: see listing under Hook & Hastings.

Source:

  • Organ Handbook: 1986 (Richmond, Va.: Organ Historical Society, 1986), 15.
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We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 29, 2019.

January 12, 2016:

For further information see E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings

 

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 29, 2019.

October 30, 2004:

Note from the Organ Database Builders editor Stephen Hall, May 27, 2017. -

The firm of E. & G. G. Hook was established by brothers Elias Hook and George G. Hook in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1827; they relocated to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1831. The Hook brothers had been cabinet makers who apprenticed with the organ builder William Goodrich prior to opening their own shop. By 1860, the firm was the largest organ builder in the United States. The firm was producing roughly twenty organs per year prior to stopping production during the Civil War. Production resumed in 1864, and reached its former level the same year.

The firm was succeeded by E. & G. G. Hook & Hasting in 1872 when junior partner Frank Hastings became a full partner.

Source:

  • Orpha Ochse. The History of the Organ in the United States (Indiana University Press, 1975), 122-130, 217.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on February 11, 2019.

Database Specs:

  • 796 Organs
  • 1 Divisions
  • 2 Consoles

This builder has been viewed 245 times.