Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Steer & Turner [J.W. Steer] View Extant Instruments View Instruments

Distinction:

Westfield, Massachusetts, 1866-1879; SpringField Massachusetts 1879-1891.
Classification: Builder

Update This Entry
August 29, 2015:

Note from Organ Database Builders editor Stephen Hall, January 10, 2018. -

In 1867, two former employees of the Johnson company opened their own firm in Westfield, Massachusetts. John W. Steer had built at least one organ under his own name before he was joined by George W. Turner. The firm suffered severe losses from both fires and flood, and by 1877 was in severe financial difficulties. The factory was moved to Springfield in 1879. Steer began spelling his name Steere around 1890. Turner left the firm in 1891, and the name was changed from Steere & Turner to J.W. Steere & Sons, then J.W. Steere & Son in 1894. It was also later known as J.W. Steere & Son Organ Company (1901-1919), and then The Steere Organ Co. 1919-1920. In 1920 the factory burned, the following year E.M. Skinner acquired the business and consolidated it with his own.

George Turner formed a partnership with John S. Steere (John W.'s son) that was also known as Steere & Turner (1893-1894).

Sources:

  • Orpha Ochse, The History of the Organ in the United States (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1975), 240-241.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on February 11, 2019.

October 30, 2004:

Note from the OHS PC Database, derived from A Guide to North American Organbuilders, by David H. Fox (Richmond, Va., Organ Historical Society, 1991, rev. ed. 1997). -

Partnership of John Wesley Steer(e) and George William Turner in Westfield, Massachusetts, 1866; firm relocated to Springfield, Massachusetts, 1879-1891; succeeded by J. W. Steere* & Sons.

*The Steers added an e at the end of their name around 1880. -Ed.

Staff: Edward W. Angell; George W. Badger; S. M. Bucknam; William C. Greenwood; Emmons Howard; J. R. McKay; Frederick C. Miller; Leonard D. Morris; Charles A. Pierce; Harlan P. Seaver; Frank J. Steere; A. Stine; J. B. Wetmore.

Sources:

  • Orpha Ochse, The History of the Organ in the United States (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1975), 240.
  • Barbara Owen, The Organ in New England (Raleigh: Sunbury Press, 1979), 413.
  • Organ Handbook: 1985, 23.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 29, 2019.

Database Specs:

  • 38 Organs
  • 0 Divisions
  • 0 Consoles