Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Skinner Organ Co. (Opus 524, 1925)

Location:

Holy Trinity Episcopal Church / St. Ann & the Holy Trinity Episcopal Church
157 Montague at Clinton
New York City: Brooklyn, NY US
Organ ID: 11166

Update This Entry

Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Episcopal and Anglican Churches
  • The organ has been rebuilt or substantially revised.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP pitman
  • 64 ranks. 4,244 pipes. 4 manuals. 57 stops. 68 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): EP pitman chests
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 4
  • Stops: 57
  • Registers: 68
  • Position: Console in fixed position, center.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in vertical rows on angled jambs.
  • Combination Action: Adjustable combination pistons.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals, AGO standard placement.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard meeting AGO Standards.
  • Has Crescendo Pedal
  • Has Tutti Reversible Thumb Piston(s)
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Toe Piston(s)
  • Has Coupler Reversible Thumb Piston(s)
  • Has Coupler Reversible Toe Piston(s)
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Jeff Scofield on November 20, 2020:

From the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project: The Protestant Episcopal Church of the Holy Trinity in Brooklyn Heights was designed by Minard Lafever (1798-1854) and completed in 1848. Lafever's design is considered one of the finest masterpieces of the Gothic Revival style in America. The church's elaborate interior features a soaring nave highlighted by lierne vaulting which employs wood-frame plaster vaults. More than 7000 square feet of stained glass by William Jay Bolton depict the "Jesse Tree" of Christ’s ancestry; this astounding collection is perhaps the most significant early American stained glass installation. Bolton’s organ loft window is on permanent exhibition in the American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A clash between the bishop and rival factions within the parish led to the closure and dissolution, in 1959, of Holy Trinity Church. In 1969, St. Ann's Church, faced with a crumbling building only a few blocks away, moved into the former Holy Trinity Church, resulting in the present name of St. Ann and the Holy Trinity. At this time, the E.M. Skinner organ was modified, and a new five-manual console was installed with Virgil Fox as the consultant. In 1979, the New York Landmarks Conservancy intervened to save the aging church and stained glass, and in 1983 the St. Ann Center for Restoration and the Arts was founded. The center’s record of success included the restoration of the chancel window, 64 stained glass windows by William Bolton in the nave (considered the earliest of their type in America), and the exterior fence. With support from World Monuments Fund, a conditions survey was carried out and matching funds were made available from the New York State Bond Act to restore the roof. Today the church is open for services and restoration efforts are moving ahead. St Ann's is also seeking to make the property more self-sustaining through the sensitive development of its adjacent Parish Hall.

In 1968, the Skinner organ was altered and enlarged by Tom Farrell of Brooklyn. A new five-manual drawknob console was built by the Keates-Geissler Pipe Organ Company of Acton, Ontario, Canada, and installed in 1970. The Keates console had drawknobs that were engraved with an Old English font, and included preparations for many additions. Since that time, the organ has undergone extensive physical and tonal restorative work as funding allowed. Stops that had been loudened were returned to their original volume. In 2003, the Solo division was completely restored and the Tuba Mirabilis, which had been moved to a horizontal position atop the Solo box, was repaired and returned to its original location. The console was rebuilt by John Randolph in 2005, and the Swell reeds were restored by Chris Broome in 2010. The Organ Historical Society awarded its distinguished Historical Citation No. 240 in recognition of the Skinner Organ as an outstanding example of organbuilding and worthy of preservation.

We received the most recent update for this note from Jeff Scofield on November 20, 2020.

Database Manager on May 07, 2018: We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Database Manager on March 06, 2006:

Updated through information adapted from E. M. Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner Opus List, by Sand Lawn and Allen Kinzey (Organ Historical Society, 1997), and included here through the kind permission of Sand Lawn:
Replaced #142; organ extant; five manual Keates console installed in 1968; considerable alterations by Farrell and Van Zoeren.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Building formerly that of Holy Trinity Episcopal. 5 manual Keates console added in 1968. Alterations by Farrell and Van Zoeren.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
From Allen Kinzey: Open In New Tab Typed stoplist
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

1968 Console: Photograph by Jeff Scofield via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project. Taken on 1996-07-03

Church interior to rear and organ case: Photograph from an archival source: Skinner Organ Co. via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken approx. 1925

Church interior to front, stained glass windows: Photograph by Steven E. Lawson via the NYC AGO Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2010-09-09

Church exterior: Photograph by Steven E. Lawson via the NYC AGO Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2010-09-09

Pipe Organs in New York sponsored by:
This instrument has been viewed 281 times.