Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Geo. H. Ryder (Opus 24, 1874)

Location:

First Methodist / Erie Street Methodist Episcopal
Erie Street
Cleveland, OH US
Organ ID: 18252

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Status and Condition:

  • The organ has been relocated.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 35 ranks. 4 divisions. 3 manuals. 31 stops.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Divisions: 4
  • Stops: 31
  • Manual Compass: 58
  • Pedal Compass: 30
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on December 03, 2008:

Updated through information from Unpublished Organ Research Notes of Dr. Stephen Schnurr; as edited by Joseph McCabe, 2008 -- Geo. H. Ryder of Reading, Massachusetts provided a new three-manual thirty-four rank, thirty stop organ in 1874, opus 24. Church records include the following on May 5, 1874, "on motion of Bro. Haines, Brothers Massey & Foljambe were authorized to execute a contract with Geo. M. Ryder for building the organ in accordance with his proposition as reported to this meeting, Price $5,800. Then on September 29, 1874, "a letter was read from Mr. Ryder in reference to coloring the pipes of the organ which on motion was referred to Mr. Ryder to exercise his own judgment in the premises. Barbara Owen, in The Organ in New England, notes that this may have been the builder-s first three-manual instrument. In reference to the organ, some sources refer to the congregation as the Erie Street Methodist Episcopal Church, no doubt in deference to the church-s location at that time. (There was, indeed a contemporary congregation by the name of Erie Street Church.) However, the organ was undoubtedly built for First Church, as identified in an article in the Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, journal, The Vox Humana. (This article gave the purchase price as $7,000.) The instrument was housed in a Gothic case measuring thirty feet in height, twenty in width, twelve in depth. The Reverend Edgar H. Boadway, in the Boston Organ Club Newsletter, March 1966, page 10, called this a magnum opus for the builder. The organ was rebuilt for the current church building when the congregation moved in 1905.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on February 11, 2019.

Database Manager on June 16, 2005:

Identified through information in Descriptive Catalogue of Superior Church Organs Manufactured by Geo. H. Ryder & Co., published in Boston, January, 1896. That list gives the location as Erie Street Methodist Episcopal; later information indicates this was First Methodist.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Typed stoplist from Joe McCabe
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

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