Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

The Ernest M. Skinner Co. (Opus 145, 1907)

Location:

Tompkins Avenue Congregational Church / First A.M.E. Zion Church
54 McDonough Street at Tompkins Avenue
New York City: Brooklyn, NY 11216 US
Organ ID: 19653

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Methodist Churches
  • The organ is extant in this location, possibly in original state.
  • The organ's condition is not playable.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP pitman
  • 49 ranks. 2,839 pipes. 5 divisions. 4 manuals. 46 stops. 56 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): EP pitman chests
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 4
  • Divisions: 5
  • Stops: 46
  • Registers: 56
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 30
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Jeff Scofield on November 19, 2020:

From the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project: In 1907, Ernest M. Skinner Company of Boston installed a four-manual-and-pedal organ in Tompkins Avenue Church. Skinner retained the existing case and 28 ranks from the previous Midmer organ, and also installed an early example of his Orchestral Oboe stop. The organ was played from a four-manual drawknob console. The organ was dedicated on March 2, 1908 by Clarence Eddy, who was then the organist and choirmaster of the church. Marcel Dupré presented his last American concert of 1937 on this organ, performing Bach's Fantasy and Fugue in G minor; the Allegro from Handel's Organ Concerto No. 10; Mozart's Fantasy in F minor; Sowerby's "Comes Autumn Time," and works of Saint-Saëns, Mendelssohn, Reger, Russell, Schubert and Dupré.

n 1942, Tompkins Avenue Congregational Church merged with and moved to the Flatbush Congregational Church, located at 19th Street and Dorchester, forming the Flatbush-Tompkins Congregational Church. The membership of the merged churches was 4,100, making it the largest Congregational Church in the United States at the time. The Tompkins Avenue building was then acquired by the First A.M.E. Zion Church. As of 2006, the organ was extant but unplayable.

We received the most recent update for this note from Jeff Scofield on November 19, 2020.

Database Manager on December 06, 2010:

Updated through online information from Connor Annable.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on November 19, 2005:

Identified through information adapted from E. M. Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner Opus List, by Sand Lawn and Allen Kinzey (Organ Historical Society, 1997), and included here through the kind permission of Sand Lawn:
Replaced a Midmer; dedicated March 2, 1908 by Clarence Eddy; retained existing case and twenty-eight ranks; extant.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
From Allen Kinzey: Open In New Tab Typed stoplist
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Chancel and organ case: Photograph by Photograph by Bryan Dunnewald, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 1959-05-19

Sanctuary and organ case: Photograph by Photograph by Bryan Dunnewald, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2015-05-19

Pipes in chamber: Photograph by Photograph by Bryan Dunnewald, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2015-05-19

Chamber interior: Photograph by Photograph by Bryan Dunnewald, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2015-05-19

Console and facade: Photograph by AS Archives, submitted by John Roper.

Facade in room: Photograph by AS Archives, submitted by John Roper.

Building: Photograph by AS Archives, submitted by John Roper.

Facade in room: Photograph by AS Archives, submitted by John Roper.

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