Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

The Ernest M. Skinner Co. (Opus 210, 1913)

Location:

Fourth Presbyterian Church
North Michigan Avenue between Chestnut and Delaware
Chicago, IL US
Organ ID: 22272

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Presbyterian Churches
  • The organ has been altered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP pitman
  • 57 ranks. 3,484 pipes. 4 manuals. 53 stops. 74 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): EP pitman chests
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 4
  • Stops: 53
  • Registers: 74
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on December 21, 2005:

Identified through information adapted from E. M. Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner Opus List, by Sand Lawn and Allen Kinzey (Organ Historical Society, 1997), and included here through the kind permission of Sand Lawn:
Installed in 1914; restoration including tonal changes in 1946 (six ranks added); replaced by #1516 in 1970.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on December 21, 2005:

From the OHS PC Database: Congregation was formerly North Presbyterian which became Fourth Presbyterian after merger with Westminster Presbyterian in 1871.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Stoplist from <i>The Diapason</i>, May 1931
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Church Exterior: Vintage Postcard, courtesy of T. Bradford Willis, DDS (1910s).

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