Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Pipe Organ Foundation (Opus 1, 2002)

Originally Balcom and Vaughan (Opus 430, 1941)

Location:

Covenant Presbyterian Church
22116 SE 51st Place
Issaquah, WA 98029 US
Organ ID: 22463

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Presbyterian Churches
  • The organ is no longer a complete instrument; dispersed/parted out.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP unit
  • 8 ranks. 524 pipes. 1 divisions. 2 manuals. 33 stops. 8 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): EP unit chests
  • Position: In center chambers at the front of the room. No visible pipes.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 1
  • Stops: 33
  • Registers: 8
  • Position: Console in fixed position, left.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Horseshoe style console.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys in horseshoe curves.
  • Combination Action: Setterboard (remote or in console).
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard.
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Piston(s)
  • Has Coupler Reversible Toe Piston(s)
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on April 18, 2013:

Updated through online information from James R. Stettner. -- The original Balcom and Vaughan made for Sandy Balcom's residence was moved to the chapel at University Temple United Methodist Church in Seattle in 1956 by Balcom and Vaughan. It was installed in Issaquah by the Pipe Organ foundation in 2002 with one rank added: a 4' Octave. In that original installation, the organ was in a chamber at the right end of the sanctuary with the console in fixed position at the right as well. In the Fall of 2005, the Pipe organ Foundation moved the organ to the new church on essentially the same site. No tonal or mechanical changes were made a that time. The organ has since been replaced with another instrument installed by the Pipe Organ Foundation, and retaining two of the former ranks (Diapason and Clarinet) and the 16' Lieblich Gedeckt extension.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on December 29, 2005:

Identified through online information from James R. Stettner. -- This organ is a conglomerate instrument assembled by C.M. "Sandy" Balcom for his Seattle residence. The console and some of the pipework is from the Estey organ opus 2277, 1924 - originally built for the Irvington Theatre in Seattle, Washington. It was later relocated to the chapel at University Temple United Methodist Church in Seattle. Ultimately, it waspurchased by the Pipe Organ Foundation of Mercer Island, Washington for $2,100.00 and rebuilt / augmented for Covenant Presbyterian.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Stoplist copied from the console; updated June 4, 2010
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Reredos in front of the organ loft: Photograph by Michael A. Way. Taken on 2010-06-04

Organ chamber: Photograph by Michael A. Way. Taken on 2010-06-04

Organ chamber and 16' Bourdon: Photograph by Michael A. Way. Taken on 2010-06-04

Estey console: Photograph by Michael A. Way. Taken on 2010-06-04

Console detail: Manuals, stoprail, and couplers: Photograph by Michael A. Way. Taken on 2010-06-04

Console: Pedal stops: Photograph by Michael A. Way. Taken on 2010-06-04

Console: Swell stops and couplers: Photograph by Michael A. Way. Taken on 2010-06-04

Console: Great stops: Photograph by Michael A. Way. Taken on 2010-06-04

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