Skinner Organ Co. (Opus 380, 1922)

Location:

St. Joseph Roman Catholic Cathedral
212 E. Broad Street
Columbus, OH 43215 US
Organ ID: 22668

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Roman Catholic Churches
  • The organ is no longer at this location; destroyed, dispersed, relocated or taken in trade.
  • The organ's condition is not playable.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Paul R. Marchesano on August 12, 2022.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP pitman
  • 55 ranks. 3,561 pipes. 4 divisions. 4 manuals. 50 stops. 64 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): EP pitman chests
  • Position: In a gallery-level case at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 4
  • Divisions: 4
  • Stops: 50
  • Registers: 64
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in vertical rows on angled jambs.
  • Combination Action: Adjustable combination pistons.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard.
  • Has Crescendo Pedal
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Pistons
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Pistons
  • Has Coupler Reversible Toe Pistons
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Paul R. Marchesano on August 12, 2022:

Pipe Organs of Columbus OHS 2022: By 1973 the organ was in rickety condition, its mechanism failing, and with the Orgelbewegung in full swing, a decision to discard the Skinner was looming. Robert M. Turner of Turner and Associates, Hopewell, New Jersey, was retained on account of his reputation for recasting pipework of other Skinner organs as part of exciting new neo-French tonal schemes, a slowly emerging American organ trend. Turner’s 1976 proposal was executed: it would include new mechanicals and new, all electric-action wind chests. Meanwhile soon to be redundant Skinner voices were sold, and a crew from Hopewell arrived to remove items to be incorporated into the new organ. Once the salvaged elements were in Turner’s hands, the carcass of the Skinner mechanism met its fate. The huge Swell boxes, bearers, and case structure that had contained the Swell, Choir, and Solo Organs remained in place for reuse with the Turner organ.

Close to the reported end of the work in Hopewell, a fire of suspicious origin broke out in the shop and Turner subsequently declared bankruptcy. Three local organ enthusiasts, including Mr. Herzog, made a quick trip to New Jersey, hired a moving company, and in a goodwill gesture toward the cathedral “basically absconded with the organ” to avoid any further loss.

Over the next several months, specifications would evolve as Wicks compiled additional analysis of salvaged organ components. The inventory of items surveyed begs the obvious question: which did more damage to the Turner organ project in reality—the fire, or whatever underlying business issues existed that led to the almost simultaneous bankruptcy? Either way, the lack of completed organ work for the money already paid by the cathedral was disproportionate.

[ed. The result was the Wicks "rebuild" of this organ which sufficed until replaced by the Fritts organ.]

We received the most recent update for this note from Paul R. Marchesano on August 12, 2022.

Database Manager on February 06, 2007:

Updated through online information from James R. Stettner.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on January 08, 2006:

Identified through information adapted from E. M. Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner Opus List, by Sand Lawn and Allen Kinzey (Organ Historical Society, 1997), and included here through the kind permission of Sand Lawn:
Dedication recital by Edwin Arthur Kraft on April 18, 1923; replaced by 3/68 Wicks, #5667 in 1968.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab From Allen Kinzey via <i>The Aeolian-Skinner Archives</i>
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Cathedral exterior: Photograph by Cathedral Facebook, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2021-01-21

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