Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

M. P. Möller (Opus 5641, 1929)

Location:

First United Methodist Church
333 Wartburg Place
Eldora, IA 5627 US
Sanctuary
Organ ID: 31969

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Methodist Churches
  • The organ has been restored to a previous state.
  • The organ's condition is good, in regular use.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Jim Stettner on September 27, 2021.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP pitman, EP unit
  • 12 ranks. 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 12 stops. 22 registers.
Great:
  • Chest Type(s): EP pitman chests
  • Built by M. P. Möller
We received the most recent update for this division from Jim Stettner on September 27, 2021.

Swell (Expressive):
  • Chest Type(s): EP pitman chests
  • Built by M. P. Möller
We received the most recent update for this division from Jim Stettner on September 27, 2021.

Pedal:
  • Chest Type(s): EP unit chests
  • Built by M. P. Möller
We received the most recent update for this division from Jim Stettner on September 27, 2021.
Main:
  • Built by M. P. Möller
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 12
  • Registers: 22
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys above top manual.
  • Combination Action: 'Hold and Set' pneumatic/mechanical system.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals, AGO standard placement.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard meeting AGO Standards.
  • Has Crescendo Pedal
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Pistons
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Pistons
  • Has Coupler Reversible Toe Pistons
We received the most recent update for this console from Jim Stettner on September 27, 2021.
Jim Stettner on September 27, 2021:

From the 'History' page of the parish website. -- "The Ladies' Aid gave $5,000 toward the purchase of the Moller Pipe Organ. In the spring of 1927 Mrs. Koeneman, Mrs. Gethman, and Mrs. Leonard had spent two days in Chicago listening to organs of various sizes. After much thought and discussion, the decision was made to purchase the Moller organ you hear today. The organ was built by M.P. Moller of Hagerstown , Maryland , the largest organ manufacturer in the world at that time. The instrument was designed for the newly remodeled building after careful study of conditions and acoustics. The two manual consoles are connected to the organ proper by electric wires, and the touch of the keys is as light as that of a piano with instantaneous response. The organ is housed in a special chamber built behind the grillwork at the side of the chancel. A heating unit was installed to insure an even temperature throughout the year. The organ has approximately 1000 pipes and a set of twenty bar chimes."

We received the most recent update for this note from Jim Stettner on September 27, 2021.

Database Manager on February 12, 2014:

Updated through online information from Richard C Greene. -- Restored by Dobson Pipe Organ Builders, 2008.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on December 04, 2007:

Identified from factory documents and publications courtesy of Stephen Schnurr.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Stoplist from Dobson Organbuilders, Ltd.: Open In New Tab Originally published 2008
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Jim Stettner on September 27, 2021.

Instrument Images:

Church exterior: Photograph from an archival source: Vintage postcard, submitted by Jim Stettner. Taken approx. ca. 1905

Console: Photograph by Dobson Organ Co., submitted by Jim Stettner. Taken approx. ca. 2008

Builder's nameplate: Photograph by Dobson Organ Co., submitted by Jim Stettner. Taken approx. ca. 2008

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