Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

M. P. Möller (Opus 5775, 1930)

Location:

First Seventh Day Baptist Church of Alfred
5 Church Street PO Box 821
Alfred, NY 14802 US
Sanctuary
Organ ID: 32050

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Baptist Churches
  • The organ is currently being renovated or restored.
  • The organ's condition needs attention, but in usable condition.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP pitman
  • 19 ranks. 1,600 pipes. 4 divisions. 3 manuals. 36 stops. 65 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): EP pitman chests
  • Position: In center chambers at the front of the room. Facade pipes or case front visible.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Divisions: 4
  • Stops: 36
  • Registers: 65
  • Position: Console in fixed position, center.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys above top manual.
  • Combination Action: 'Hold and Set' pneumatic/mechanical system.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals, AGO standard placement.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard meeting AGO Standards.
  • Has Tutti Reversible Thumb Pistons
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Pistons
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Pistons
  • Has Combination Action Toe Pistons
  • Has Coupler Reversible Thumb Pistons
  • Has Coupler Reversible Toe Pistons
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on January 04, 2013:

Updated through online information from Scot Huntington. -- The town was originally known as Alfred Center. The organ was placed in the refurbished sanctuary following the 1929 Palm Sunday fire which severely damaged the original 1886 Steer & Turner instrument, op. 211. The Moller was purchased by the Rosebush family in memory of their mother Sara.

The initial arrangements were handled by Stephen Rosebush of Appleton, Wisconsin, on behalf of the family, (and who had initially made contact with Ford & Reynolds, the territorial Moller agent in Chicago ), but the town of Alfred fell within the jurisdiction of Buffalo agent R.J. Jackson who had also negotiated directly with the church. A major row then ensued between the two Moller agents as to who was owed the substantial commission. F&R was notorious for paying graft under the table in order to secure a contract, and had promised a kickback to Stephen Rosebush as well as a commission to an organist in Appleton, Wisconsin whom they were cultivating for the purpose of recommending Moller organs to potential clients, and who, as a friend of the family, was responsible for dictating to the factory the rather bizarre and illogical stop tablet layout. Ultimately, the Alfred church intervened on behalf of Mr. Jackson whom they felt provided outstanding service, and the two Moller agents split the commission with the factory, also making the "commission" payments to the two Wisconsin parties.

Owing to the difficult financial conditions of the time, the family giving the organ was not able to complete their payment obligations until November of 1931. The contract was signed in March, 1930 and the organ was delivered the following June. In addition to Moller, the other builders submitting tenders for the project were Austin, Estey, Gottfried, and Marr & Colton.

The original pneumatic relays and switches were replaced with noisy and slow electro-magnet supply house units in the late 1960s, and current plans are hoping to replace these failing units with solid state equipment in order to return the action to its original quick response.

In the 1980s, members from both churches using the ca. 1850 building, (the Alfred Seventh Day Baptist and Union University congregations), releathered the windchest valve actions. The on-going renovations of the organ are now under the care of the Parsons Organ Co. of Penfield, NY, and under whose direction the Tuba was recently refurbished by Broome & Co. of Granby, Connecticut.

The organ woodwork is walnut, and the facade pipes were originally painted "antique gold bronze."

The above information is from the extensive correspondence file maintained in the Moller Collection by the OHS American Organ Archives.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on February 27, 2011:

Updated through on-line information from Larry Philbrick.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on January 27, 2009:

Updated through on-line information from James R. Stettner.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on January 15, 2009:

Updated through on-line information from Laurel Buckwalter.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on December 06, 2007:

Identified from factory documents and publications courtesy of Stephen Schnurr.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Stoplist taken from the console January 11, 2012
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Church interior with facade: Photo by Virginia Haynes. Taken on 2007-03-01

Facade and console: Photo by Virginia Haynes. Taken on 2007-03-01

Console: Photo by Virginia Haynes. Taken on 2007-03-01

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