Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Schlicker Organ Co. (1941 ca.)

Originally John Brown (1901)

Location:

Trinity Lutheran Church
West Genesee St.
Wellsville, NY 14895 US
Sanctuary
Organ ID: 50853

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Lutheran Churches
  • The organ has been relocated.
  • The organ's condition is good, in regular use.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Jim Stettner on February 13, 2022.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Electro-pneumatic (EP)
  • 16 ranks. 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 20 stops. 32 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Electro-pneumatic (EP) chests
  • Position: In side chambers at the front of the room. Facade pipes or case front visible.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 20
  • Registers: 32
  • Position: Console in fixed position, left.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys above top manual.
  • Combination Action: 'Hold and Set' pneumatic/mechanical system.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals, AGO standard placement.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard not meeting AGO standards.
  • Has Tutti Reversible Thumb Pistons
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Pistons
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Pistons
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on January 12, 2013:

Updated through online information from Scot Huntington. -- In 1941, following a major redecoration of the interior, the former tracker organ was electrified and rebuilt by the Schlicker Organ Co. of Buffalo, reusing the pipework of the original organ with some minor additions. The Celeste was likely new or another stop repurposed. The 1941 organ existed unaltered until the congregation moved to a new building following the flood of 1972.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on January 12, 2013:

Updated through online information from Scot Huntington.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on January 05, 2013:

This entry describes an original installation of a new pipe organ. Identified by Scot Huntington, based on personal knowledge of the organ. -- The organ was installed in a narrow, deep chamber to the left of the altar in this large, acoustically live frame church dating from the second half of the nineteenth century. Both divisions were encased in a single swell enclosure and spoke through an inadequately small opening behind a simple and minimalistic pipe fence of gold painted dummies. The church was built close to the Genesee River and was so severely damaged during the 1972 flooding from Hurricane Agnes that it was condemned and torn down. The land was taken for river reclamation forcing the congregation to relocate to another location, and the original building site is now under the dike. The organ was placed in storage at the Schlicker factory in Buffalo, awaiting the church's plans for rebuilding. The congregation eventually built a new building on North Main Street, and the organ was reinstalled there by the Schlicker company in 1974. With only a modest budget to work with, the tonal modifications and updating were minimal.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Taken from console: Open In New Tab Originally published December 24, 1970
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Scot Huntington on June 24, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Sanctuary interior after the 1941 redecoration and the newly-installed Schlicker electrification of the former organ: Photograph from an archival source: Courtesy the Wellsville Historical Society, submitted by Scot Huntington. Taken approx. 1941

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