Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Hilborne L. Roosevelt (1884)

Location:

St. Luke's Episcopal Church
Carey Street at Rankin Place
Baltimore, MD US
Organ ID: 5167

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Episcopal and Anglican Churches
  • The organ has been rebuilt or substantially revised.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider with pneumatic pull-downs (externally, EP or TP)
  • 31 ranks. 3 manuals. 30 stops.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider with pneumatic pull-downs (externally, EP or TP) chests
  • Position: In side chambers at the front of the room. Facade pipes or case front visible.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Stops: 30
  • Position: Console in fixed position, right.
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in vertical rows on flat jambs.
  • Combination Action: Adjustable combination pistons.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on May 04, 2017:

Updated by Steven Bartley, who maintains the organ.
As of 3/2107 the organ was tuned for Easter. Part of the 1920s L&H renovation included rearranging the pedal pipes inside the chamber and providing a picket fence of dummy pipes facing the transept. The 16 Bourdon & 16 Diapason pedal ranks are 27 pipes, each, but playable at 8' pitches, but no additional pipes or mechanism were added to extend them the full compass. The manual keyboards are 61, but the manual wind chests are only 58 notes. The Great is prepared for a 16 Diapason, but no preparation in the chamber, or space for this stop. The Great is also prepared for a enclosed mixture and 4 Flute, toe & rack boards are in place. Access to the sacristy is made via meandering path through the organ. A novelty device, original to the organ, was a foot lever that opened a small door in the back wall of the Choir box. This was so the organist could close the Choir shades, open this door, which faces the door to the sacristy, and the choristers could hear the organ, but the congregation would not, allowing the choir to process into the chancel singing.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on May 27, 2013:

Updated through online information from Steven Bartley.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Status Note: There 1991.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Electrified by Lewis & Hitchcock in 1929. [Possibly rebuilt by J. Edward Shad at one point. (T 3:3:3).]

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Typed stoplist (Source: Baltimore Pipe Organ Rescue website, 2013-01-18)
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

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