Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Giles Beach (1849)

Location:

Grace Episcopal Church
32 Montgomery Street
Cherry Valley, NY 13320 US
Organ ID: 54478

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Episcopal and Anglican Churches
  • The organ has been relocated.
  • The organ's condition is good, in regular use.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 5 ranks. 1 divisions. 1 manuals. 6 stops. 6 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a gallery-level case at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 1
  • Divisions: 1
  • Stops: 6
  • Registers: 6
  • Position: Keydesk attached.
  • Manual Compass: 58
  • Pedal Compass: 99
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with hinged doors that enclose keyboards.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in vertical rows on flat jambs.
  • Combination Action: No combination action.
  • Swell Control Type: Trigger/hitch-down swell.
  • Pedalboard Type: No pedalboard.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on April 19, 2015:

Updated through online information from Scot Huntington. -- At some point following its installation, a 13-note pedalboard and 16' Bourdon was added, presumably by Giles Beach. At the time of the organ's acquisition by the Farmer's Museum in Cooperstown, the 2' Fifteenth pipes had long been missing. The organ was installed in a small rear gallery. When the Grace church purchased Hook-Hastings Co. No. 1997., 1903, a 2-8 too large for the gallery and installed at the front of the church, the choir was moved to the newly enlarged chancel as well- a circumstance which ended up preserving the Beach. The instrument remained derelict and unplayable in the gallery, until purchased by the Farmer's Museum in 1964 for restoration and installation in an historic church moved to the Museum grounds in 1961.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Stephen L. Pinel, "Giles Beach and the American Church Organ Works" from <i>Litterae Organi: Essays in Honor of Barbara Owen</i>
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

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