Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Meloni & Farrier (2015)

Originally Henry Erben (1840)

Location:

First Moravian Church
154 Lexington Avenue
New York City: Manhattan, NY 10016 US
Organ ID: 64313

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Moravian Churches / Unity of the Brethren
  • The organ is unaltered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is good, in regular use.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on August 13, 2019.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 17 ranks. 772 pipes. 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 16 stops. 19 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a gallery-level case at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on August 13, 2019.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 16
  • Registers: 19
  • Position: Keydesk attached, manuals set into case.
  • Manual Compass: 58
  • Pedal Compass: 25
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style without cover.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in vertical rows on flat jambs.
  • Combination Action: No combination action.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals.
  • Pedalboard Type: Flat straight pedalboard.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on August 13, 2019.
Database Manager on August 12, 2019:

According to the New York City Organ Project website, This 1840 Erben organ was originally built for the French Episcopal Church du St. Esprit, located at Franklin and Church Streets in NYC. It was a G-compass organ: manuals were GGG to f' (58 notes), and the pedal compass was CCC to C (25 notes). In 1863, the French church was sold at auction, and the Erben organ was bought by the Church of the Mediator, who had the organ moved and installed in their current building. That building was purchased by First Moravian in 1869.

In 1906, Thomas H. Wood of New York City rebuilt the 1840 Erben organ. He reworked the instrument to be a CC-compass instrument: manual compass of CC to f' (54 notes), and a pedal compass of CCC to E (29 notes). Total cost of the rebuild was $600. In 1969, the organ was rebuilt by Samuel O. Donelson of New York City.

In 2008, Meloni & Farrier Organbuilders of Port Chester, N.Y., were contracted to restore the organ to as close as possible to the original 1840 Henry Erben design. The manual key frames and Swell bass chest were extended to GGG. Missing pipes from the 1902 rebuild were fabricated in the Meloni & Farrier shop, using the existing pipes as a scale measurement. Many of the pipes were bent or broken, and required extensive repair and revoicing. All key action and stop action parts were either cleaned and restored, or replaced where none existed. The organ also received a new blower. The restored organ was dedicated on Sunday, May 17, 2015, with Elaine Comparone, organist.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on August 13, 2019.

Database Manager on August 12, 2019:

In August of 2019, Anthony Meloni posted on a Facebook organ group that the organ was for sale. The congregation will be moving to a new church and Meloni & Ferrier will be building them a new organ. A developer purchased the property and the organ must be removed.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on August 13, 2019.
Stoplist from the NYC AGO New York City Organ Project: Open In New Tab
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on December 26, 2019.

Instrument Images:

Restored keydesk: Photograph by Anthony Meloni.

Organ in rear gallery: Photograph by Steve Lawson.

Church interior: Photograph by Steven E. Lawson. Taken on 2015-09-09

Church exterior: Photograph by Steven E. Lawson. Taken on 2015-09-09

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