Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

E. & G. G. Hook (Opus 460, 1868)

Exhibited in the 2005 OHS convention

Location:

First Christian Congregational
1113 Grand Army of the Republic Highway
Swansea, MA 02777 US
Organ ID: 6595

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Congregational Church
  • The organ has been altered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition needs attention, but in usable condition.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Paul R. Marchesano on May 02, 2022.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 8 ranks. 407 pipes. 2 divisions. 1 manuals. 8 stops. 10 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a case at the front of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 1
  • Divisions: 2
  • Stops: 8
  • Registers: 10
  • Position: Keydesk attached.
  • Manual Compass: 58
  • Pedal Compass: 25
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with a keyboard cover that can be lifted to form a music rack.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in horizontal rows on terraced/stepped jambs.
  • Combination Action: No combination action.
  • Swell Control Type: Trigger/hitch-down swell.
  • Pedalboard Type: Flat straight pedalboard.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on March 17, 2016:

Updated through online information from Scot Huntington.
The church was built between 1830 and 1832, but whether it had an organ prior to the Hook is presently unknown. The 1868 E. & G.G. Hook organ was originally installed in the 2nd-floor gallery beneath the steeple, which at the time was the liturgical front of the church: one entered the sanctuary with the congregation facing you.

In 1873, the liturgical axis was reversed, and a chancel addition was built at the other end to accommodate the organ, choir, and pulpit, all on a raised platform. The organ was slightly recessed into a niche at the rear of the chancel. The organ case was originally designed to fit beneath the curved ceiling, and a peaked cornice box was added to the top of the case to improve its squat proportions when moved to the front of the church.
,br>An electric blower was added and the facade pipes painted gold at an unknown date. The organ was refurbished by the Andover Organ Company in 1963. This work was largely restorative in nature, but alterations were made to the wind system and tonal regulation at that time. In 2008, Andover beautifully restored the original facade pipe stenciling.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
2005 OHS Handbook: Open In New Tab
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Paul R. Marchesano on May 02, 2022.

Instrument Images:

Facade at front of room: Photograph from an archival source: 2005 OHS Handbook, William T. Van Pelt, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken on 2004-05-10

Keydesk: Photograph from an archival source: 2005 OHS Handbook, William T. Van Pelt, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken on 2004-05-10

Right stop jamb: Photograph from an archival source: 2005 OHS Handbook, William T. Van Pelt, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken on 2004-05-10

Hitch-down swell pedal: Photograph from an archival source: 2005 OHS Handbook, William T. Van Pelt, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken on 2004-05-10

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