Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

A. B. Felgemaker Co. (1886)

Location:

Presbyterian Church
114 Mulberry Street
Ripley, OH 45167 US
Organ ID: 6624

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Presbyterian Churches
  • The organ is unaltered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 12 ranks. 662 pipes. 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 12 stops.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a case at the front of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 12
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 27
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on January 22, 2017:

Updated by J. A. Hefner
The organ [and its clacking action] can be heard here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icVF7ykeXoA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=veninRr9e_E
The first video is an interesting listen as I hear certain pipe voices that are also audible in the 1942 Schantz at High Str. UMC...likely the pipes reused from the 1881 Felgemaker.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on February 23, 2009:

Updated through online information from Linda P. Fulton. -- An interesting fact about this organ: the church acquired it by chance. It was originally built for a church in Charleston, SC and was on a flatboat on the Ohio River, on its way to Charleston. The boat captain received word that the church in Charleston did not want the organ and happened to be in the vicinity of Ripley. He asked if any church in Ripley wanted the organ and the Presbyterians accepted it. The reason the church in Charleston did not want the organ was likely the earthquake of August 31, 1886, which did a considerable amount of damage in Charleston. Long-time church members related the story to me of how the church acquired the organ, but no one ever mentioned exactly why. I read an article in a geological journal, Earth (Jan. 2009), which mentioned the earthquake and am putting "two and two together." Also, there was an article about this church entitled "Small Town Choir" in the May 11, 1942 issue of Life magazine. There are several photos which show the organ.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on February 21, 2009:

Updated through online information from Linda P. Fulton. -- There are two mechanical combination pedals. The left hand one puts on the "soft" Great stops, while the right hand one adds the diapason chorus.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Stoplist from console, originally 2001, updated to 2013
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Sanctuary Interior, Chancel, and Pipe Facade: Photograph by Linda P. Fulton. Taken on 2007-07-25

Sanctuary Interior, Chancel, and Pipe Facade: Photograph by Linda P. Fulton. Taken on 2007-12-12

Organ Case and Keydesk: Vintage Photograph (early 1900's) from the Church Archives; image submitted by Linda Fulton.

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