Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

W. W. Kimball Co. (1900)

Location:

St. Jerome Catholic Church
230 Alexander Avenue
New York City: The Bronx, NY 10454 US
Organ ID: 66617

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Roman Catholic Churches
  • The organ has been rebuilt or substantially revised.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Jeff Scofield on November 11, 2020.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Information unknown or not applicable
  • 37 ranks. 4 divisions. 3 manuals. 35 stops. 36 registers.
Great, Swell, Choir and Pedal:
  • Position: In gallery-level chambers at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Jeff Scofield on November 11, 2020.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Divisions: 4
  • Stops: 35
  • Registers: 36
  • Position: Console in fixed position, center.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys above top manual.
  • Combination Action: Adjustable combination pistons.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard meeting AGO Standards.
  • Has Crescendo Pedal
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Toe Piston(s)
We received the most recent update for this console from Jeff Scofield on November 11, 2020.
Jeff Scofield on November 11, 2020:

From the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project: The organ in the second St. Jerome's Church was originally built by the W.W. Kimball Company of Chicago. Kimball installed the pipes and mechanisms behind two cases that flank the stained-glass windows in the gallery. On the left side are the Great and Choir divisions, with speaking façade pipes from the Great 16' and 8' Diapasons, and on the right side are the Swell and Pedal divisions. Kimball employed tubular-pneumatic action, a feature that proved to be unreliable in many of that firm's organs of the period. At an unknown time, the organ was mechanically rebuilt by the Estey Organ Company of Brattlesboro, Vt. Estey installed electro-pneumatic action and the three-manual console that exists today.

After more than a century of use and water damage the organ was nearly unplayable. In 2012 the church contracted with Glück Pipe Organs of New York City to restore various components of the historic instrument. During restoration work, the date "August 16, 1900" was found written inside one of the windchests.

We received the most recent update for this note from Jeff Scofield on November 11, 2020.
Sebastian Glück via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project: Open In New Tab
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Jeff Scofield on November 11, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Gallery, chambers and pipe façades: Photograph by Sebastian Glück via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2011-01-28

Console: Photograph by Sebastian Glück via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2011-01-28

Church exterior: Photograph by Thomas J. Shelley via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2011-01-28

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