Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

J. W. Steere & Son (1908)

Location:

Our Saviour English Lutheran Church
39 Covert St.
New York City-Brooklyn, NY 11207 US
Organ ID: 66698

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Lutheran Churches
  • The organ has an unknown or unreported status.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Jeff Scofield on November 24, 2020.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Information unknown or not applicable
  • 11 ranks. 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 11 stops. 11 registers.
Great, Swell and Pedal:
  • Position: In side chambers at the front of the room. Facade pipes or case front visible.
We received the most recent update for this division from Jeff Scofield on November 24, 2020.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 11
  • Registers: 11
  • Position: Keydesk attached.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 30
  • Key Action: Tubular-pneumatic connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Tubular-pneumatic connection between stop control and chest.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in horizontal rows on terraced/stepped jambs.
  • Combination Action: Fixed mechanical system.
  • Has Combination Action Toe Piston(s)
We received the most recent update for this console from Jeff Scofield on November 24, 2020.
Jeff Scofield on November 24, 2020:

The English Lutheran Church of Our Saviour was founded on August 3, 1901, and was the first English speaking congregation of the Missouri Synod in Brooklyn. At some time, possibly around 1908 when the organ was installed, the congregation opened a brick Gothic church building on Covert Street, between Broadway and Bushwick Avenue. The church closed at an unknown time, but the building is extant and used as a V.F.W. post.

The organ in Our Saviour's English Lutheran Church was built by J.W. Steere & Son of Springfield, Mass. A ledger book copy of the contract shows that Steere used "Weigle's Tubular Pneumatic System of organ action," and had a case (and organist's bench) of quarter-sawed oak with display pipes decorated in French Gold Bronze. The attached keydesk had draw stops placed in angled terraces, a roll top cover, and a concave pedalboard with radiating sharps. Wind was provided by an Orgoblo operating on 220 volts D.C. The contract was signed on September 14, 1908, and the organ was to be finished by December 1, 1908. Total price was $2190.

We received the most recent update for this note from Jeff Scofield on November 24, 2020.
Larry Trupiano via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project: Open In New Tab
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Jeff Scofield on November 24, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Church interior and pipe façade: Photograph from an archival source: Brooklyn Public Library via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken approx. 1920

Church interior to rear: Photograph from an archival source: Brooklyn Public Library via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken approx. 1920

Church exterior: Photograph by Brooklyn Public Library via the NYC AGO NYC Organ Project, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken approx. 1920

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