Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Doug Eyman (1986)

Originally Skinner Organ Co. (Opus 758, 1929)

Location:

Westgate Baptist Church
Lancaster, PA 17600 US
Organ ID: 7171

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Baptist Churches
  • The organ is unaltered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is good, in regular use.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Jeff Scofield on November 12, 2020.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Electro-pneumatic (EP)
  • 33 ranks. 4 divisions. 3 manuals. 29 stops. 36 registers.
Great, Swell, Choir and Pedal:
  • Chest Type(s): Electro-pneumatic (EP) chests
  • Position: In side chambers at the front of the room. No visible pipes.
We received the most recent update for this division from Jeff Scofield on November 12, 2020.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Divisions: 4
  • Stops: 29
  • Registers: 36
  • Position: Console in fixed position, right.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in vertical rows on angled jambs.
  • Combination Action: Adjustable combination pistons.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard meeting AGO Standards.
  • Has Crescendo Pedal
  • Has Tutti Reversible Thumb Piston(s)
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Toe Piston(s)
We received the most recent update for this console from Jeff Scofield on November 12, 2020.
Database Manager on November 01, 2019:

Opus 758 is alive and well, tonally unaltered. The organ was "stolen," but not "restored." To make a very long story shorter, Opus 758, a III/29 E. M. Skinner, was originally given to the Brooklyn Museum in 1929 (dedicated by Lynwood Farnum) by the wealthy Blum family, with the condition that the Museum could never dispose of it by selling it, but instead must donate it to a church. The Museum chose to eliminate the organ in 1975, and the newly-formed Westgate Baptist congregation was given ownership of it, and engaged a local "organ-person" to transplant the organ from Brooklyn to Lancaster. Probably thinking the local "hicks" would never notice, he put the Skinner in a cohort's home, and installed a hodge-podge of warehouse-clearing ranks in the spacious chambers of the newly-built church. When this double-switch was discovered, the church reluctantly went to court and won back possession of their Skinner, but they neglected to sue for the additional expense of another organ-transplant, and the church's budget for same was near zero. Douglas Eyman guided some dedicated volunteers from the congregation, one everning a week over the next seven years, to pack, move, re-leather-as-necessary (about 25 percent) and install the Skinner. The organ was re-dedicated by the late Earl Miller in 1986, and continues to receive benign neglect from the congregation, except that the increasingly unreliable orginal combination action has recently been replaced with a solid-state system by the local firm of R. J. Brunner & Co. The organ has been awarded an OHS Preservation Plaque,

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on November 02, 2019.

Database Manager on May 07, 2018: We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Database Manager on February 10, 2013:

Updated through online information from William Dunklin.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on November 01, 2019.

Database Manager on May 09, 2006:

Updated through information adapted from E. M. Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner Opus List, by Sand Lawn and Allen Kinzey (Organ Historical Society, 1997), and included here through the kind permission of Sand Lawn:
Restoration of E. M. Skinner Opus 758 (1929), originally installed in The Brooklyn Museum. The organ was given to Westgate Baptist Church, Lancaster, Pennsylvania in 1975; during removal organ was stolen by organ technician and installed in private home; after discovery and court trial, finally installed in church in 1986; restored by Douglas Eyman; extant.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on November 01, 2019.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Status Note: There 1986

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

From the Brooklyn (NY) Art Museum. Restored c. 1986 by Douglas Eyman & church members. Historic Organs Recital 12 Dec 1986.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Stoplist from the console and from the <i>Aeolian-Skinner Archives</i>: Open In New Tab
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on November 02, 2019.

Instrument Images:

Console: Photograph by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2019-10-16

Console, chancel and chambers: Photograph by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2019-10-16

Sanctuary interior: Photograph by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2019-10-16

Left Stopjamb: Photograph by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2019-10-16

Right Stopjamb: Photograph by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2019-10-16

Coupler rail: Photograph by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2019-10-16

Builder name plate: Photograph by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2019-10-16

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