Emil Witzmann (1885ca.)

Exhibited in the 2002 OHS convention(s)

Location:

St. John United Church of Christ
1475 W Algonquin Road
Palatine, IL 60067 US
Organ ID: 1197

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: United Churches of Christ (UCC)
  • The organ has been renovated with changes from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is good, in regular use.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Paul R. Marchesano on April 06, 2022.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 8 ranks. 421 pipes. 2 divisions. 1 manuals. 8 stops.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: Pipes exposed (in whole or in part) in a gallery at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 1
  • Divisions: 2
  • Stops: 8
  • Position: Keydesk attached.
  • Manual Compass: 58
  • Pedal Compass: 27
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with a keyboard cover that can be lifted to form a music rack.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in horizontal rows on flat jambs.
  • Swell Control Type: No enclosed divisions.
  • Pedalboard Type: Flat straight pedalboard.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Paul R. Marchesano on April 06, 2022:

The organ is attributed to Emil Witzmann. From the 2002 OHS Handbook: "...the organ probably dates from around 1885, contemporaneously with or shortly after the church's dedication. It bears no nameplate, but the initials "E W " can b e found on pipework; moreover, it is similar in design, construction and pipe markings to an instrument three stops larger at a sister congregation, Immanuel United Church of Christ in nearby Streamwood. This organ was visited as part of the 1984 Organ Historical Society convention, and is definitely known to have been built in 1888; it is also without a nameplate and has no builder named in church records. The "prickly" Gothic treatment of both cases, in carrying the arches fully over the pipework, was a declining style in this countr y by then, and points to their manufacture by a smaller, regional, more conservative organbuilder less concerned with or influenced by the latest organ trends. Further evidence points to a local solution. One of Saint John's histories says that the organ cost $875, which would be a reasonable price of about $roo a stop for an organ built regionally in the 1880s, but not from a firm with national clients with the attendant extra shipping costs. Germanic parishes, particularly rural ones, also tended to buy organs from a fairly local market, and usually from Germanic builders if possible, for reasons of ethnic relationship."

We received the most recent update for this note from Paul R. Marchesano on April 06, 2022.

Database Manager on November 01, 2015:

Updated through online information from Laura DArgo.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 07, 2011:

Updated through on-line information from Connor Annable.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on September 05, 2009:

Updated through on-line information from Scott Regula.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab From The Stopt Diapason Autumn 1997
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Facade: Photograph by Erik Matson. Taken on 2017-05-25

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